Wednesday, June 18, 2014

James Baldwin's "A Talk To Teachers"


I began by saying that one of the paradoxes of education was that precisely at the point when you begin to develop a conscience, you must find yourself at war with your society.  It is your responsibility to change society if you think of yourself as an educated person.  And on the basis of the evidence – the moral and political evidence – one is compelled to say that this is a backward society. 
Now if I were a teacher in this school, or any Negro school, and I was dealing with Negro children, who were in my care only a few hours of every day and would then return to their homes and to the streets, children who have an apprehension of their future which with every hour grows grimmer and darker, I would try to teach them -  I would try to make them know – that those streets, those houses, those dangers, those agonies by which they are surrounded, are criminal.  I would try to make each child know that these things are the result of a criminal conspiracy to destroy him.  I would teach him that if he intends to get to be a man, he must at once decide that his is stronger than this conspiracy and they he must never make his peace with it.
This is James Baldwin talking to teachers in "A Talk To Teachers" from 1963. Pretty soon we're going to start reading and thinking about Jose Vilson's This Is Not A Test around this blog. If you're waiting around for your copy of Vilson's book, you could do worse than start with Baldwin.

Drop a comment if you've got thoughts!

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